25% Off Through July 9!

U.S. and Canada customers take 25% of everything in our Etsy and eBay shops through July 9. Antiquities, ancient coins, books, prints. Discount refunded immediately after checkout.
eBay: http://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities
Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt

 

Antiquities authentication and valuation: the thrill of examining long forgotten collections

It’s always a thrill when a new customer contacts me out of the blue to examine a group of objects for purposes of authentication or valuation or for help with bringing the collection up for sale. Often these are objects that have been passed down from parents or grandparents, and just as often the current owner has no way of knowing if the objects are genuine antiquities, fakes or modern tourist pieces.

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Egyptian scarabs, amulets and beads forming part of a large California collection formed in the 1940s and 50s

 

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From the same old California collection, a group of fine Roman intaglio gemstones.

I do sometimes have to disappoint a customer, informing them that what they thought was a collection of Egyptian mummy masks, for example, is really cheap “airport art” made for sale to European or American tourists fifty years ago. But just as often I find myself privileged to examine their collections in their homes, sometimes from dusty boxes that haven’t been opened in many years or in the recesses of dark basements or garages. Very often the task can be completed simply by examining digital images.

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A large and exceptional Etruscan terracotta head, probably depicting Mercury. Northern California collection formed in the 1960s.

 

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Egyptian Middle Kingdom amethyst necklace. Southern California private collection, 1950s.

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Superb 2nd Century AD Roman bronze Isis.

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Well preserved Greek South Italian terracotta antifex. 4th Century BC.

I can’t begin to count the number of objects or large groups of objects I’ve examined in person or online or actually handled. Enjoy these images of just a handful of the exceptional antiquities and groups of objects I’ve had the good fortune to work with over the past eight years. Please feel free to contact me if you need my antiquities consulting services, for authentication, valuation or help with bringing the objects to sale. Our standard rate is $50 per hour or fraction thereof. We also offer consignment of your objects for sale with a 25% commission.

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Late Dynastic Egyptian stone head of a Pharaoh.

 

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Part of a very large Colorado private collection of Holy Land oil lamps formed in Israel / Palestine / Jordan in the 1960s.

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Roman marble head of a Putti or Cherub, detached from a larger sculpture.

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A small Roman bronze figure of Eros.

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A small pottery pyxis, Athens, 4th Century BC.

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Freshly cleaned of dust in a basement where they’d lain for 40 years, a group of 3 well preserved Roman glass vessels.

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Roman Provincial Coinage: A Brief Review

Roman provincial coinage is an area of study in which non-academics, especially avid collectors and dealers, can make real contributions to the study of the ancient Roman world. While many thousands of different provincial types or variants are known, new ones are still routinely being discovered.They offer a much wider range of imagery than the Roman Imperial issues, with reverses that touch upon religious, economic and social phenomenon, political events and foreign relations. The images used in this article are Roman provincial coins sold by Clio Ancient Art over the last several years.

Roman provincial coins, Antioch coin, Philip II, ancient coins, Tyche

Syria, Antioch, Bronze 29 mm of Philip II, AD 247-249, with turreted, draped & veiled bust of Tyche right, leaping ram above, star below. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

The Roman provincial coin issues dating between the late 1st Century BC and the end of the 3rd Century AD were initially struck in both the western and eastern portions of the Empire, from points as distant from one another as Rhesaina in the province of Mesopotamia to Emerita Augusta near the Atlantic coast of Hispania. But by the end of the 1st Century AD, provincial coinage had become an exclusively eastern phenomenon, with coins being struck at mints in southeastern Europe, Greece, Asia Minor, Syria/Palestine and Egypt.

Roman coins, ancient coins, Augustus, antiquities

Bronze 24 mm coin of Julia Traducta in Spain, with head of Augustus. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

Most Roman provincial coins were issued in the name of individual cities or leagues of cities. A city could receive permission from the Roman Senate or the Emperor to issue coins, and these would mainly be used as small change, supplementing the official coinage of the Roman state apparatus struck at Rome and a few other Imperial mints. City coinages were nearly always bronze.

Other provincial coins were literally that: coins issued by a particular province, such as Syria or Egypt. These coins usually included silver issues of several values based on the Tetradrachm, as well as a range of bronze denominations. These currencies were intended to be sealed into their provinces, creating a closed economic system.

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Egypt, Alexandria. Potin Tetradrachm of Diocletian, AD 284-305.

Victory (Nike) advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

Roman Syria, Roman Empire, Roman Coins, Ancient Coins

Syria, Antioch. Bronze 30 MM of Phillip I. 244-249 AD. Laureate and cuirassed bust of Phillip facing left holding spear and shield. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

Both Alexandria in Egypt and Antioch in Syria had continuous histories of coin production in both bronze and silver, lasting from the time of Augustus until AD 298. The later Egyptian teradrachms were struck in an alloy called Potin, comprised of bronze, tin and lead. This alloy patinates in very particular ways during burial in the ground, resulting in some especially beautiful surfaces on the coins.

Provincial coins are an endless source of information and enjoyment. Because most were struck in bronze, even large and very well preserved examples sell for very reasonable prices, especially when compared to Imperial bronze coins of similar size and quality.

Roman Provincial, Nicopolis, Roman coins, ancient coins, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities

Moesia Inferior, Nicopolis Orichalcum 5 Assarion (28 mm) of Gordion III, AD 238-244 Reverse of Demeter standing, facing left, holding torch and ears of grain, VP CAB MODECTOV NIKOPOLEITWN PROC ICTR (in Greek). Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

To learn more about Roman provincial coins, we recommend the following –

  • The Roman Provincial Coinage Initiative online. Organized through Oxford University, the site includes an excellent overview of Roman provincial coins and an extensive database with good, clear images (over 19,000!) and descriptions. http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/intro/
  • The Wildwinds ancient coin site online. Although Wildwinds combines Greek with Roman Provincial coins, they are easily distinguished through use of an alphabetical list of issuing authorities, a geographically ordered index and other tools for narrowing a search. http://wildwinds.com/coins/greece/i.html