Roman oil lamps, Roman antiquities, Roman artifacts, Roman art, Roman pottery

A Sample of our finer Roman oil lamps

Over the years we’ve sold countless ancient pottery oil lamps. As is typical of the market for this type of antiquity, most ancient lamps are the more common low-fired pottery lamps from the Levant (Palestine / Israel / Jordan / Syria). These have a special significance for many collectors and the general public because of their connection to the Holy Land, Judaism and early Christianity. Less common and more expensive are the finely made red ware lamps of the early Roman period. These are formed of a higher grade of clay fired to a higher temperature. These often feature molded designs on their discus, ranging from mythological imagery to scenes from the theater, and sometimes have clear maker’s marks on their base. We have several of these in stock. These are depicted here, in multiple views, with links to them in both our Etsy shop and eBay store.

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ABOVE: A Roman pottery oil lamp from North Africa, 2nd Century AD, featuring an unusual scene of a dwarf or child slave with a wine amphora. Probably a theatrical image derived from Roman comedy. In our eBay store here –  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Roman-Pottery-Oil-Lamp-with-Head-of-Jupiter-1st-2nd-Century-AD-/132219587757?hash=item1ec8e6ccad:g:hH4AAOSwgZ1Xsflm  And in our Etsy shop here – https://www.etsy.com/listing/261629936/a-roman-pottery-oil-lamp-with-rare?ref=shop_home_active_11

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ABOVE: A Roman pottery oil lamp, possibly North Africa, Circa 120-180 AD, featuring a Krater (large open top vase with handles) with vegetation growing from it. In our eBay shop here –  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Superb-Roman-Redware-Pottery-Oil-Lamp-with-Vase-Decoration-and-Makers-Mark-/132190951787?hash=item1ec731d96b:g:Qm8AAOSw0fhXiVAl  And in our Etsy store here – https://www.etsy.com/listing/265120673/roman-redware-pottery-oil-lamp-with-vase?ref=shop_home_active_2

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ABOVE: A Roman pottery oil lamp with a wild haired head of Jupiter, from North Africa, 2nd Century AD. In our eBay store here – http://www.ebay.com/itm/Roman-Pottery-Oil-Lamp-with-Head-of-Jupiter-1st-2nd-Century-AD-/132219587757?hash=item1ec8e6ccad:g:hH4AAOSwgZ1Xsflm

And in our Etsy store here – https://www.etsy.com/listing/265121541/roman-redware-pottery-oil-lamp-with-head?ref=shop_home_active_1

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ABOVE: We also have a selection of oil lamps from the Holy Land, Roman, Byzantine and Early Islamic. Above is a good example of a Late Roman type. In our eBay store here – http://www.ebay.com/itm/A-Late-Roman-Pottery-Holy-Land-Oil-Lamp-Circa-AD-400-/132190749536?hash=item1ec72ec360:g:zysAAOSwCGVX3tsy   And in our Etsy store here – https://www.etsy.com/listing/280572988/a-late-roman-pottery-holy-land-oil-lamp?ref=shop_home_active_6

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NEW ITEMS IN OUR ONLINE SHOPS…

We’ve added some new items to our online shops, including the following:

In our Amazon.com bookstore, we’ve added a couple of new titles –

In our Etsy shop, some fine antiquities-related 19th Century prints –

A few additions to our online shops

Here are images, with links, to some recent additions to our Etsy and eBay online stores. Links will open in a new window or tab.

 

 

25% Off through 1/31 at Clio’s eBay Store

Hello Clio Customers, Friends and Fans:

We are offering a huge 25% off of everything in our eBay store, including antiquities, ancient coins and books, through January 31. It’s been years since we’ve offered such a large discount, so please take a look. Pay the listed price and your 25% will be promptly refunded to you via PayPal. This offer is for our eBay store only, not our other selling platforms. There are currently 82 items listed, ranging in price from $12 to $450.

Find us on eBay here – http://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities

Thanks for looking and best wishes.

Christof M. Maupin
Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities
Wilmington, NC 28403

Clio Ancient Art Facilitates Major Gifts of Antiquities to Three Universities and Colleges

As 2016 nears it’s end, we are proud to share with you that Clio Ancient Art facilitated gifts of ancient pottery oil lamps and vessels from one of our clients to 3 colleges and universities:

* University of Missouri at Kansas City Department of Classical Studies

* University of North Carolina at Wilmington Department of Art and Art History

* Cape Fear Community College Humanities and Fine Arts Department.

In each case the gift consisted of 100 pottery lamps and vessels, mainly from the Eastern Mediterranean, ranging in date from the Late Hellenistic through Roman, Byzantine and early Islamic periods. All were from a private collection assembled in the Middle East in the mid-1960s.

We are proud and pleased that these gifts will help educate and inspire future generations of students in art, art history, archaeology and classical studies. #CFCC #UNCW #UMKC #Clio #Antiquities #ancient15577564_1400620523289006_461207361_n

This Week’s Featured Object: 15th Century Thai Glazed Pottery Jar

This week’s featured object does not come from the Mediterranean, Classical or Near Eastern worlds but from Southeast Asia. It represents an important phase in Asian history in which China retreated from the world stage, leaving smaller kingdoms to fill the resulting gap in international trade.

In a Blog article earlier this month  (https://clioantiquities.wordpress.com/2016/10/01/distant-connections-contact-and-object-exchange-between-mediterranean-and-far-east-asian-civilizations-in-the-first-few-centuries-ce/) we explored recently unearthed connections between the Mediterranean world and East Asia, focusing on portable objects found many thousands of miles away from their points of origin. This week’s antiquity ties in well with that theme.

To put this object in context, it is worth reviewing the early years of China’s Ming Dynasty. The Ming were of true Chinese ancestry, unlike the previous Yuan Dynasty of Mongol origin. The third Ming Emperor, Zhu Di, asserted Chinese authority, from the Mongol regions to the north, the Tibetan Plateau to the east, Korea and Japan to the west and Southeast Asia. He was also responsible for assembling the vast naval flotilla of ocean-going ships that would sail under the Imperial Eunuch Zheng He, reaching points as far away as India, Yemen and the Middle East and even the east coast of Africa. Zheng He, despite being raised in the Imperial Court, was born Muslim in China’s southwestern Yunnan Province, a background that made him uniquely qualified to lead the famed “Seven Voyages.”

Despite great interest aroused by overseas expeditions, the Ming were facing difficulties with their expansionist policies. Attempts to subdue Japan and Vietnam proved costly and unsuccessful, while extravagance at home, including construction of the new Capital at Beijing and its Forbidden City, drained the state coffers. Conservative Confucian elements succeeded in reversing Ming internationalist policies, even banning construction of seagoing ships. Zheng He’s travel chronicles were officially condemned and forgotten. Export of Chinese products, especially much valued porcelain, dried up.

Stepping into the resulting market void were newly resurgent states, including the Kingdom of Ayudhya (also spelled Ayutthaya) in what is now Thailand. Conveniently for the Kingdom, the neighboring Khmer Empire (centered in what is now Cambodia) collapsed just as the last of Zheng He’s Seven Voyages was underway. Ayudhya and its predecessor Kingdom of Sukhothai, which became its vassal, were fortunate to be located in a region with converging river systems that provided the clay needed for pottery production and the transport system for exporting finished ceramics. With the Ming Chinese largely out of the trade picture, Thai ceramic artists produced great quantities of high-end celadon wares, underglaze wares, including blue floral underglaze wares to imitate Ming porcelains, and simple stonewares with thick glazes of brown or green. This week’s featured object belongs to this last category. These wares were produced at hundreds of known kiln sites around Sawankalok in Thailand’s north-central region. This has resulted in some confusion, with the place names, pottery types and phases becoming interchangeable, to include Sawankalok, Sukhothai and Sri Satchanalai (another location with a concentration of kilns). All of these ceramic types were widely exported, with finds not only throughout Southeast Asia but as far away as the Philippines to the west, Indonesia to the south and even the Islamic world. Our example was found as a burial offering in the Philippines in the early 1960s.

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To learn more about this antiquity or to acquire it, visit our online stores –

Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/listing/454522892/green-glazed-stoneware-pottery-jar?ref=shop_home_active_6

eBay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Green-Glazed-Stoneware-Pottery-Jar-Kingdom-of-Sukhothai-15th-Century-/131979053816?hash=item1eba908af8:g:8lkAAOSwSv1XlPym

 

New Video from the Museum of London Looks at a Genetic Study of Roman Londoners

The Museum of London has undertaken the first multidisciplinary study of the inhabitants of a Roman city anywhere in the Empire. In the video Curators Dr Rebecca Redfern and Caroline McDonald explain how this was done through the analysis of the ancient DNA (aDNA) of four different individuals from the Roman period. This analysis has established the hair and eye color of each individual, their chromosomal sex, and to identify the diseases they were suffering from. Their research has created a detailed ‘picture’ of the inhabitants of Londinium, the Roman name for London.

Video opens in a new tab or window –

https://youtu.be/SbU1lSZWVno

Tel Halaf, Mesopotamia, archaeology, Iron Age, Syria, antiquities, British Museum, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities

Tel Halaf Reliefs in the British Museum. Fate of Tel Halaf Unknown

Clio Ancient Art Tel Halaf Reliefs British Museum

These are basalt reliefs from the 10th Century BC Aramaean palace at Tel Halaf (ancient Guzana) in northeastern Syria. Excavated between 1911 and 1921 by a German expedition under Max von Oppenheim. This section comes from the south wall of the palace, which was decorated with 187 relief segments in black basalt alternating with ochre colored limestone. The area of Tel Halaf is now disputed between ISIS and rival Jihadi militias and the fate of the site is unknown. This fragment and others are safely on display in the British Museum. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

Tel Halaf, Mesopotamia, archaeology, Iron Age, Syria, antiquities, British Museum, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities

Tel Halaf, Mesopotamia, archaeology, Iron Age, Syria, antiquities, British Museum, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities