A sampling of antiquities available for holiday shopping

As we approach the holiday shopping season, we thought you might enjoy a simple photo montage of some of the fine antiquities we have available for purchase this year. We can be found online here:

Our Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt

Our eBay store: https://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities

Our Amazon book shop: www.amazon.com/shops/ClioAncientArt

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25% Off Through July 9!

U.S. and Canada customers take 25% of everything in our Etsy and eBay shops through July 9. Antiquities, ancient coins, books, prints. Discount refunded immediately after checkout.
eBay: http://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities
Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt

 

Roman Provincial Coinage: A Brief Review

Roman provincial coinage is an area of study in which non-academics, especially avid collectors and dealers, can make real contributions to the study of the ancient Roman world. While many thousands of different provincial types or variants are known, new ones are still routinely being discovered.They offer a much wider range of imagery than the Roman Imperial issues, with reverses that touch upon religious, economic and social phenomenon, political events and foreign relations. The images used in this article are Roman provincial coins sold by Clio Ancient Art over the last several years.

Roman provincial coins, Antioch coin, Philip II, ancient coins, Tyche

Syria, Antioch, Bronze 29 mm of Philip II, AD 247-249, with turreted, draped & veiled bust of Tyche right, leaping ram above, star below. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

The Roman provincial coin issues dating between the late 1st Century BC and the end of the 3rd Century AD were initially struck in both the western and eastern portions of the Empire, from points as distant from one another as Rhesaina in the province of Mesopotamia to Emerita Augusta near the Atlantic coast of Hispania. But by the end of the 1st Century AD, provincial coinage had become an exclusively eastern phenomenon, with coins being struck at mints in southeastern Europe, Greece, Asia Minor, Syria/Palestine and Egypt.

Roman coins, ancient coins, Augustus, antiquities

Bronze 24 mm coin of Julia Traducta in Spain, with head of Augustus. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

Most Roman provincial coins were issued in the name of individual cities or leagues of cities. A city could receive permission from the Roman Senate or the Emperor to issue coins, and these would mainly be used as small change, supplementing the official coinage of the Roman state apparatus struck at Rome and a few other Imperial mints. City coinages were nearly always bronze.

Other provincial coins were literally that: coins issued by a particular province, such as Syria or Egypt. These coins usually included silver issues of several values based on the Tetradrachm, as well as a range of bronze denominations. These currencies were intended to be sealed into their provinces, creating a closed economic system.

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Egypt, Alexandria. Potin Tetradrachm of Diocletian, AD 284-305.

Victory (Nike) advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

Roman Syria, Roman Empire, Roman Coins, Ancient Coins

Syria, Antioch. Bronze 30 MM of Phillip I. 244-249 AD. Laureate and cuirassed bust of Phillip facing left holding spear and shield. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

Both Alexandria in Egypt and Antioch in Syria had continuous histories of coin production in both bronze and silver, lasting from the time of Augustus until AD 298. The later Egyptian teradrachms were struck in an alloy called Potin, comprised of bronze, tin and lead. This alloy patinates in very particular ways during burial in the ground, resulting in some especially beautiful surfaces on the coins.

Provincial coins are an endless source of information and enjoyment. Because most were struck in bronze, even large and very well preserved examples sell for very reasonable prices, especially when compared to Imperial bronze coins of similar size and quality.

Roman Provincial, Nicopolis, Roman coins, ancient coins, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities

Moesia Inferior, Nicopolis Orichalcum 5 Assarion (28 mm) of Gordion III, AD 238-244 Reverse of Demeter standing, facing left, holding torch and ears of grain, VP CAB MODECTOV NIKOPOLEITWN PROC ICTR (in Greek). Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

To learn more about Roman provincial coins, we recommend the following –

  • The Roman Provincial Coinage Initiative online. Organized through Oxford University, the site includes an excellent overview of Roman provincial coins and an extensive database with good, clear images (over 19,000!) and descriptions. http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/intro/
  • The Wildwinds ancient coin site online. Although Wildwinds combines Greek with Roman Provincial coins, they are easily distinguished through use of an alphabetical list of issuing authorities, a geographically ordered index and other tools for narrowing a search. http://wildwinds.com/coins/greece/i.html

A Sample of Our Sold Antiquities from 2016

The images below represent a good sample of the many ancient Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, early Islamic and other Mediterranean and related antiquities and ancient coins sold by Clio Ancient Art during 2016. Some of our regular customers reading this blog entry might recognize pieces they now own. As always we have many more items available in our online stores:

Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt

eBay: http://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities

And don’t forget our Amazon book store, with many excellent and hard to find antiquities related titles: www.amazon.com/shops/ClioAncientArt

 

antiquities, ancient art, artifacts, Clio

Holiday Shopping with Clio Ancient Art

Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities has much to offer as we enter the holiday season. With up to 100 antiquities, artifacts, ancient coins, books about antiquities and related art now available from ancient Rome, Greece, Egypt, Cyprus and the Holy Land, you are sure to find a unique gift for that collector, history buff or other special someone on your list.

20160713_113851-2_kindlephoto-486861080  il_fullxfull-893230696_il5iSierra Exif JPEG Roman coins for sale, Victorinus, Silver antoninianus  CA-12-254

Shop with us on Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt
Shop with us on eBay: http://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities

 

Clio Ancient Art Antiquities, Roman coins

This Week’s Featured Item: A Small Coin with a Big Story

This week’s featured object is a small bronze coin of the Roman Emperor Constantius II. That may not be a name that jumps out from the pages of history the way Roman Emperors like Augustus, Nero or Hadrian do but in his own way Constantius II was a remarkable ruler.

Born in what is now Serbia to Constantine I, also known as Constantine the Great, and the Empress Fausta, he was one of three sons, along with his brothers Constantine II and Constans. Constantine I elevated Constantius to the rank of Caesar in AD 324. While serving in this role Constantius fought against barbarian incursions along the Danube frontier and gained valuable experience that would serve him later.

constantius-ae3-antioch-obv

Upon the death of his father Constantine I, who by any measure was surely one of the most remarkable, energetic and dynamic figures in Roman history, the three sons met to divide the Roman domains among themselves as co-emperors. A purge had taken place upon Constantine’s death that included the murder of two male cousins whom Constantine had apparently intended to serve as co-rulers with his sons. Roman commentators place the blame for this purge squarely on Constantius but the bias in these sources makes this less than certain. Constantius’ share of the Empire included the Balkans and Greece, Egypt, Palestine, Syria and Asia Minor (modern Turkey), while the European and North African provinces were governed by his brothers.

In the years that followed, Constantius demonstrated great vigor as both a military leader and an administrator. Clearly, the trust his late father Constantine had placed in him was justified. In addition to managing a long and bloody (though inconclusive) war against the resurgent Persian Empire in the east, he countered numerous barbarian thrusts into the west along the Rhine and Danube frontiers and put down multiple serious revolts led by usurper would-be emperors in Europe. At a time when the allegiance of the legions to the legitimate Emperor or a usurper was never a sure thing, the reverse legend on this coin – GLORIA EXERCITUS or Glory of the Army — conveyed the image of loyalty and stability. The mint mark visible on the bottom, reading SMANAI, refers to Antioch, then in the province of Syria (now in modern Turkey), where Constantius spent considerable time during his campaigns against the Persians.

Clio Ancient Art Antiquities, Roman coins

Bronze coin of Constantius II struck at Antioch

Constantius ruled as sole legitimate Emperor from AD 353 until his death in 361 but in total, from his elevation to the rank of Caesar in 324, he ruled for 29 years, making him one of the longest reigning Roman Emperors. He reigned in a troubled period of Roman history, one in which lesser men might have floundered. Whatever his shortcomings, he did hold the Empire together against many threats both internal and external. This tiny coin, worth very little in its day and still quite inexpensive today, as these were made in their countless thousands by the Imperial mints and a great many survive in excellent condition, tells part of that story.

bust-of-the-roman-emperor-constantius-ii

Marble portrait of Constantius II excavated in Syria and now in the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology

For those interested in acquiring this objects it may be found in our Etsy store here –

https://www.etsy.com/listing/478001671/roman-empire-constantius-ii-ad-337-361?ref=shop_home_active_1

And our eBay store here –

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Roman-Empire-Constantius-II-Bronze-AE-3-of-Antioch-/131935182141?hash=item1eb7f31d3d:g:XagAAOSwFe5X1H1d

 

Discovery of Unique Late Roman Coin Hoard in Spain

Here are links to 2 different news articles about this recent spectacular accidental find. The unique context of the find may reveal much about the nature of monetary policy and / or military pay in the late Roman Empire in the west.

BBC News article – http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-36172538

The Guardian article, with video – https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/apr/29/massive-haul-ancient-roman-coins-unearthed-spain

Egyptian antiquities, ancient art, antiquities dealers, Clio Ancient Art

Clio Ancient Art’s New Look and New Items

Customers, Friends and Fans of Clio Ancient Art:

We are very pleased to announce that the new and improved version of our website is live online now. In addition to many new items for sale (see below) we have redesigned the site and added many great features to make your visit both easier and more interesting. Here’s a brief rundown –
• Our old format allowed viewing no more than 20 or so items per page in a vertical row, sorted by price, resulting in an excessive number of pages for a large category, such as Roman Antiquities, and many items were rarely viewed. All categories have now been consolidated so there is only one Roman page, one oil lamps page, etc.
• When clicking on a category (note there are new categories, including “Cypriot Antiquities” and “Pottery Vessels”) visitors will see up to 30 items at a time, sorted alphabetically. This may be changed using the drop down menus at the top of the category to view up to 200 items at a time and to sort them by price (low to high or the reverse), alphabetically or most recently added.
• We’ve added a “Search” option at the top of the page. A customer entering the search word “Byzantine” for example will then receive a list of categories on the site that include that term and a list of individual objects.
• Customers may complete a form to join our online mailing list or to create their own account with Clio Ancient Art, which speeds up invoicing and order processing, allows tracking of order status and compiles a history of purchases from Clio.
• When clicking on an object from our inventory, customers will be able to hover their cursor over the image to allow for a detailed close up inspection.

No doubt there will be a few minor bugs to work out over the next several days but we do think the new format will make your customer experience much better. We’ll also be adding more content in the next few days.
Here is a list, with links, of some recently added objects on our website –

EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES
• An Egyptian Pale Blue Faience Ushabti – http://clioancientart.com/anegyptianpalebluefaienceushabti.aspx
• An Egyptian Bronze Figure of Osiris – http://clioancientart.com/anegyptianbronzefigureofosiris.aspx
• A Deep Blue Egyptian Faience Amulet of Daumutef – http://clioancientart.com/adeepblueegyptianfaienceamuletofdaumutef.aspx
• A Deep Blue Egyptian Faience Amulet of Hapi – http://clioancientart.com/adeepblueegyptianfaienceamuletofhapi.aspx
• Egyptian Bronze Figure of Osiris – http://clioancientart.com/egyptianbronzefigureofosiris2.aspx
• Egyptian Bronze Figure of Osiris – http://clioancientart.com/egyptianbronzefigureofosiris3.aspx

ROMAN ANTIQUITIES
• Late Roman / Migration Period Military Bronze Belt Buckle Plate – http://clioancientart.com/lateromanmigrationperiodmilitarybronzebeltbuckleplate.aspx
• A Late Roman to Early Byzantine Trail Decorated Glass Bead – http://clioancientart.com/alateromantoearlybyzantinetraildecoratedglassbead.aspx
• Roman Glass Crumb Decorated Bead – http://clioancientart.com/romanglasscrumbdecoratedbead.aspx

BYZANTINE ANTIQUITIES
• Early Byzantine Bronze Military Phalera or Boss – http://clioancientart.com/earlybyzantinebronzemilitaryphaleraorboss.aspx
• Early Byzantine Military Baldric Buckle – http://clioancientart.com/earlybyzantinemilitarybaldricbuckle.aspx

EARLY ISLAMIC ANTIQUITIES
• An Early Islamic Trail Decorated Glass Bead – http://clioancientart.com/anearlyislamictraildecoratedglassbead.aspx

ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN COINS
• Greek Cities, Mysia, Gambrion, Bronze 16 mm, 4th-3rd Century BC – http://clioancientart.com/greekcitiesmysiagambrionbronze16mm4th-3rdcenturybc.aspx
• Roman Empire, Bronze Sestertius of Julia Mamaea, AD 180-235 – http://clioancientart.com/romanempirebronzesestertiusofjuliamamaeaad180-235.aspx
• Roman Empire, Maximian as Caesar, Bronze Antoninianus, AD 285-286 – http://clioancientart.com/romanempiremaximianascaesarbronzeantoninianusad285-286.aspx
• Roman Empire, Maximian , Bronze Antoninianus, AD 286-305 – http://clioancientart.com/romanempiremaximianbronzeantoninianusad286-305.aspx

To access specific sections on our website, follow these links –
• Ancient Oil Lamps for Sale – http://clioancientart.com/ancientoillampsforsale.aspx
• Ancient Byzantine, Migration Period, Etruscan, Islamic, Celtic, Near Eastern & Related Antiquities – http://clioancientart.com/byzantinemigrationetruscanislamicneareast.aspx
• Ancient Coins for Sale: Roman, Greek, Byzantine, Early Islamic – http://clioancientart.com/ancientromanbyzantineislamicandgreekcoins.aspx
• Ancient Cypriot Art & Antiquities for Sale – http://clioancientart.com/ancientcypriotartandantiquitiesforsale.aspx
• Ancient Egyptian Art & Antiquities for Sale – http://clioancientart.com/ancientegyptianartandantiquitiesforsale.aspx
• Ancient Glass Vessels & Beads – http://clioancientart.com/ancientglass-page1.aspx
• Ancient Greek Art & Antiquities for Sale – http://clioancientart.com/ancientgreekartandantiquitiesforsale.aspx
• Ancient Jewelry & Personal Adornment – http://clioancientart.com/ancientjewelryandpersonaladornment-2.aspx
• Ancient Roman Antiquities for Sale – http://clioancientart.com/romanantiquities-page1.aspx
• Ancient Pottery Vessels for Sale – http://clioancientart.com/clioancientartandantiquities.aspx
• Framed & Un-Framed Art, Books & Publications – http://clioancientart.com/framedandun-framedartbooksandpublications.aspx

As always, thanks for visiting. We would value any feedback you might have on the new website design. Please feel free to contact us via e-mail text or phone if you have a question about any item on our site.
Best wishes,

Chris M. Maupin
Clio Ancient Art & Antiquities
PO Box 7714
Wilmington, NC 28406
Phone 704-293-3411
Web: clioancientart.com
Email: chris@clioancientart.com

From the British Museum Blog: Mystery of the Fetter Lane Hoard

An intriguing story from The British Museum Blog. In 1908 workers in London found 46 Roman coins. But these were minted in Alexandria, Egypt. How did they get there? The Museum’s Curator of Greek and Roman Provincial Coins explores. Link opens in a new tab or window – http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2015/08/27/the-mystery-of-the-fetter-lane-hoard/

UK Portable Antiquities Scheme Releases 2013 Annual Report

The UK’s Department of Culture, Media and Sport, along with The British Museum, have issued the Portable Antiquities Scheme’s 2013 Annual Report. The Report shows how, more than ever,  this model of public participation in the finding and recording of archaeological data can have huge benefits to finders, museums and the broader base of archaeological and historical knowledge. It is a model that should be emulated by many other countries in and beyond Europe.

Some amazing key facts from the Report –

* One million finds have now been recorded by the Portable
Antiquities Scheme (PAS) since 1997.
• 80,861 PAS finds were recorded on the PAS database in 2013 (finds.org.uk/database).
• 90% of finds were found by metal-detectorists.
• 91% of PAS finds were found on cultivated land, where they are susceptible to plough damage and artificial and natural corrosion processes.
* The great majority of PAS finds are returned to the finder.
• 993 Treasure cases were reported. It is hoped that many of these will be acquired by museums for public benefit.
• Important new Treasure finds included eight Bronze Age gold bracelets from Woollaston, Gloucestershire (2013 T805), a Civil War coin hoard from Staveley, North Yorkshire (2013 T635) and a post-medieval silver ewer from Kingston Russell, Devon (2013 T476).
It is worth noting here that if about 90% of PAS finds are returned to the finders, in just 2013 this would amount to over 70,000 individual objects being available to enter the marketplace for antiquities and related items. Those who claim, with no actual proof, that the antiquities market is flooded with looted objects should consider this number. In the space of a decade this would approach nearly a million objects, many tens of thousands of them being marketable Celtic, Roman, Saxon and other antiquities. All perfectly legal under British and international law.
The PAS 2013 Report is available to download or view in PDF format here – http://finds.org.uk/documents/annualreports/2013.pdf