A sampling of antiquities available for holiday shopping

As we approach the holiday shopping season, we thought you might enjoy a simple photo montage of some of the fine antiquities we have available for purchase this year. We can be found online here:

Our Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt

Our eBay store: https://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities

Our Amazon book shop: www.amazon.com/shops/ClioAncientArt

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25% Off Through July 9!

U.S. and Canada customers take 25% of everything in our Etsy and eBay shops through July 9. Antiquities, ancient coins, books, prints. Discount refunded immediately after checkout.
eBay: http://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities
Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt

 

Special Offer in our Etsy Store: 15% Off!

We’ve created a customer Coupon for use in our Etsy store. Receive 15% off every item over $25 between now and January, 2017.

Use coupon code JAN20172 at checkout to receive your discount!

And, if you make a purchase between now and January 31 you’ll also receive an email from Etsy with another discount coupon for use in our shop good for 15% off a future purchase, valid through June 30, 2017.

Visit our Etsy shop at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/ClioAncientArt

antiquities, ancient art, artifacts, Clio

Holiday Shopping with Clio Ancient Art

Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities has much to offer as we enter the holiday season. With up to 100 antiquities, artifacts, ancient coins, books about antiquities and related art now available from ancient Rome, Greece, Egypt, Cyprus and the Holy Land, you are sure to find a unique gift for that collector, history buff or other special someone on your list.

20160713_113851-2_kindlephoto-486861080  il_fullxfull-893230696_il5iSierra Exif JPEG Roman coins for sale, Victorinus, Silver antoninianus  CA-12-254

Shop with us on Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClioAncientArt
Shop with us on eBay: http://www.ebay.com/usr/clioantiquities

 

Object of the Week: A Roman Glass Juglet Pendant

This week’s featured antiquity is a remarkable late Roman glass pendant in the shape of a vase or juglet. It belongs to a class of decorative pendants and related objects that first appear in the Eastern Mediterranean in the mid-Third Century AD and evolve into a variety of types and forms into the Fifth Century AD.

Dating to the Fourth Century AD, this example measures just over one inch in height. It is an especially uncommon form of glass pendant featuring two handles. One handle is broken away in this example but the connection points are visible. In addition, this piece is shaped like a slender glass vessel rather than the more typically jug form. The body of this object is formed of a very dark brown or purple glass, appearing black, with a fine applied rim trail of light brown. The surviving handle appears to be formed of the same color glass as the body. A disc base has been separately applied. Incorporated into the body are slices from at least four glass beads or canes, including two eye beads in red and yellow and two composite slices featuring canes of alternating colors.

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Objects of this type were made not be glass blowers but by bead makers. In fact, if one were to remove the small handle and open the foot of this object it would become a bead. The strong dark colors are typical of the revival of that palette among Roman glass makers beginning in the mid to late Third Century, as seen on both glass beads and glass vessels in the late Roman world.

While it has been suggested that this type of glass pendant may have had a Christian religious significance, there is no real evidence one way or the other. Another theory is that these were miniature scent bottles worn on the body. While finds of these objects seem to be concentrated in the Levantine region, with another substantial grouping in Egypt, suggesting they may have been manufactured in both locations, examples have been found in Southern and Central Europe and in Rome itself.

An excellent reference on this class of objects is Maud Spaer, “Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum, Beads and Other Small Objects” catalog #s 343-354 for several similar examples, and pages 170-173 for a detailed description of the general type.

Readers interested in acquiring this item may find it in our Etsy store here – https://www.etsy.com/listing/479831410/late-roman-glass-juglet-pendant-4th?ref=shop_home_active_1

and our eBay store here – http://www.ebay.com/itm/Late-Roman-Glass-Juglet-Pendant-4th-Century-AD-/132009555359?hash=item1ebc61f59f:g:RsMAAOSwj85YMjZk

Clio’s Object of the Week: A Rare Roman Glass Marbled Unguentarium, Early 1st Century AD

This week’s featured object is a lovely marbled glass bottle sometimes referred to as an unguentarium, from “unguent” meaning a salve or ointment, though in the Roman world this would most commonly have been a scented oil either for personal use or for funerary rites. Reassembled from a few large fragments, like most of its kind, it is complete, measuring 10.2 cm (4 inches) in height, and dates to the early 1st Century AD.

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The development of glass blowing made glass a common and affordable commodity rather then the preserve of the wealthy. As a result, blown glass unguentaria have survived in countless forms. The Corning Museum of Glass’ printed and online catalogs of unguentaria list dozens of distinct variations, though the great majority of these appear in plain, transparent, uncolored or naturally pale blue-green colored glass. What sets this glass vessel apart from others is its distinctive marbled glass. In this case, the semi-opaque glass is yellow and white, the white having been derived from antimony and the yellow from antimony and lead.

Throughout the Roman Republic and into the Augustan era Roman glass was still dominated by Hellenistic glass making techniques, focusing on opaque colored glass and utilizing time consuming and expensive techniques such as core forming, casting and slumping. The object featured in this article marks a moment of transition, with the introduction of glass blowing and a new preference for colorless transparent glass, and away from the older Hellenistic approach. It combines the new glass blowing technique with a lingering preference for colored glass. This combination allows the object to be dated to a narrow range of a few decades, from about AD 20-60.

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To acquire this fine ancient Roman marbled glass vessel, visit it on Clio’s Etsy shop here –

https://www.etsy.com/listing/265344324/rare-roman-glass-marbled-unguentarium?ref=shop_home_feat_4

or Clio’s eBay store here –

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rare-Roman-Glass-Marbled-Unguentarium-Roman-Empire-1st-Century-AD-/131966282422?hash=item1eb9cdaab6:g:w2kAAOSw65FXsfiP