Antiquities at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford: A Photo Essay

Visitors with a special interest in antiquities will be stunned when visiting the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford University, not only because of the great quality of ancient art and artifacts on view but also because of the key role that many of these objects have played in the development of fields such as archaeology and art history.

The Ashmolean in its present form was created in 1908 through the merger of two very old Oxford collections: the University Art Collection, begun in the 1620s, and the original gift of antiquities and curiosities from Elias Ashmole in 1692. Gifts of art and artifacts continued until by the early 19th Century the galleries had become a must see for visitors to Oxford. The superb neo-Classical building was completed in 1845 and has expanded since. Later, through the work of such distinguished scholars as Sir Arthur Evans, antiquities obtained through modern excavations poured into the collections. Today the Museum houses extraordinary Near Eastern, Egyptian, Aegean, Cypriot, Greek, Etruscan, Roman and related antiquities, well worth the train ride from London or elsewhere.

The galleries are not arranged in a strict chronological fashion but by geographic region. This allows a somewhat freer flow for the visitor. The spaces are open and easy to navigate, without the crush of dense crowds one often gets at The British Museum. Objects are thoughtfully displayed and quite well lit, though the bright lights sometimes create too much glare on the cases for successful photography. The staff is helpful, facilities of all types are easily available, the cafe is excellent and the gift shop carries a good selection of antiquities related books, catalogs, etc.

All images and caption presented here must be credited to: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities. Enjoy.

Iran, Iron Age, Near Eastern antiquities, Iranian antiquities, Ashmolean Museum

Painted terracotta tiles from the Iron Age ceremonial building called “The Painted Chamber” at Baba Jan, Iran, dated to about 800-700 BC.

Assyrian art, Assyrian sculpture, Ashurnasirpal, Nimrud, Ashmolean Museum

Assyrian winged genius from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal (883-859 BC) at Nimrud, Irag. He holds a pale of water and a pine cone to be used in a manner similar to “holy water” in modern churches. Acquired through excavation by A.H. Layard in the early 19th Century.

Egyptian antiquities, Pre-Dynastic Egypt, Egyptian artifacts, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Large ceremonial flint knives and other tools from the Hierakonopolis Deposit, an important group of Pre-Dynastic and Early Dynastic Egyptian objects.

Khasekhem, 2ns Dynasty, Egyptian antiquities, Egyptian art, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Statue of Khasekhem, last king of Egypt’s 2nd Dynasty, died 2,686 BC. In this pose he wears the White Crown of Upper Egypt. One of his sons Djoser, would be responsible for building the famed Step Pyramid at Saqqara.

6th Dynasty, Egyptian art, Egyptian antiquities, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

A large pottery lion from the Temple Enclosure at Hierakonopolis, Egypt, dating to the 6th Dynasty, about 2,325 to 2,175 BC). Appearing at first glance to be made of stone, this magnificent and technically accomplished work is, in fact, hollow pottery, resting on a plinth. Fragments of another lion were found at the site and the two may have served as guardians of the Temple precinct.

Sobek, Fayum, Amenemhat III, Egyptian sculpture, Egyptian art, Egyptian antiquities, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Limestone statue fragment of Sobek, the crocodile headed chief god of the Egyptian Fayum region. It comes from the scant remains of the funerary temple of Amenemhat III, of the 12th Dynasty, 19th Century BC. The temple was attached to his pyramid and was known as the Labyrinth to classical authors such as Herodotus, who declared it surpassed even the Great Pyramid as a wonder of antiquity

Aspelta, Napata, Kawa, Nubian antiquities, Egyptian art, Kingdom of Kush, Ashmolean Museum

Sandstone wall of King Aspelta from Temple T at Kawa, circa 600-580 BC. The Kingdom of Kush, to the south of Egypt in what is now Sudan, adopted Egyptian art, religion and funerary practices wholesale, adorning their capital cities and royal tombs in the Egyptian style. Here, King Aspelta offers Ma’at (Truth) to the ram headed god Amun-Re.

Ram of Amun, Kawa, Napatan Period, King Taharqa, Egyptian art, Asmolean Museum

Granite statue of the god Amun in the form of a ram protecting King Taharqa. Dating from about 680 BC, this is also from Temple T at Kawa and was uncovered during excavations in 1931. It has a twin in The British Museum.

Abydos, Middle Kingdom, Egyptian art, Egyptian antiquities, Ashmolean Museum

Painted Egyptian limestone grave stela of Reniseneb making an offering of food to his father Redysankh, while a scribe sits at right. From Abydos. Middle Kingdom.

Egyptian funerary stela, Egyptian art, Egyptian antiquities, Ashmolean Museum

Egyptian painted limestone funerary stela of Ankhreni, steward of the granary, with his brother and sister in law. Abydos, Middle Kingdom

Egyptian amulets, Egyptian antiquities, Egyptian art, Egyptian faience, Ashmolean Museum

Egyptian funerary amulets were placed on the body and in the mummy wrappings, representing funerary deities or parts of the body requiring special magical protection. Examples shown here are made from colored faience, hematite, carnelian and gold foil, and date mainly to the New Kingdom and Late Dynastic Period.

Egyptian shabtis, Egyptian ushabtis, Egyptian antiquities, Ashmolean Museum, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities

A stunning display of Egyptian funerary figures, servants for the afterlife known as shabtis or ushabtis. These examples date to the New Kingdom and Late Period and are mainly made from faience or glazed composition

Sir Arthur Evan, Knossos, Crete, Minoan, Arshmolean Museum, Clio Ancient Art

A display of superb Minoan pottery from the palace complex at Knossos, Crete, Circa 1,700 BC. Excavated by Sir Arthur Evans.

Knossos, Crete, Arthur Evans, Minoan, Ashmolean Museum, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities

A display of superb Minoan storage pottery from the palace complex at Knossos, Crete, Circa 1,700 BC. Excavated by Sir Arthur Evans.

Cypriot pottery, Cypriot antiquities, Cyprus antiquities, Ashmolean Museum, Clio Ancient Art

A staggering display of Cypriot pottery, mainly from the Iron Age but also running through the Classical, Hellenistic and early Roman periods.

Apollo, Classical sculpture, Cypriot antiquities, Ashmolean Museum

Hellenistic statue of a nude youth found on Cyprus and made from local limestone. The hairstyle and other features suggest this may represent the god Apollo. Circa 300-100 BC

Greek antiquities, ancient Greek art, Ashmolean Museum, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities

A superb Greek red figure pottery pyxis (jewelry box) of the 5th Century BC from Athens, accompanied by Greek gold jewelry of the Classical and Hellenistic periods.

Roman antiquities, Roman artifacts, Roman pottery, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum

Excellent display of Roman ceramic vessels, tiles and oil lamps, spanning several centuries, from the 1st Century BC through the 3rd Century AD, and three continents, including Europe, North Africa and western Asia

Roman art, Roman antiquities, Clio Ancient Art Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum

Cinerary box of a Roman woman named Cornelia Thalia, about AD 50-75. This finely made marble box from Rome is in the shape of a shrine and includes Latin text dedicated to the departed spirits of the deceased woman, whose cremated remains were kept inside.

Roman art, Roman Jewelry, Roman antiquities, Clio Ancient Art, Ashmolean Museum

Part of a display or Roman Jewelry, including objects of gold, silver, bronze and bronze that has been tinned, gilt, silvered or enameled, as well as glass, precious and semiprecious stones, jet and other materials. The types include earrings, necklaces, rings and hairpins, with a great geographic distribution, from what is now Syria and the Levant in the east to England in the west, and spanning 500 years.

Roman jewelry, Roman art, Roman antiquities, Clio Ancient Art, Ashmolean Museum

Parts of a display or Roman Jewelry in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, UK. Included are objects of gold, silver, bronze and bronze that has been tinned, gilt, silvered or enameled, as well as glass, precious and semiprecious stones, jet and other materials. The types include brooches, earrings, necklaces and clasps, with a great geographic distribution, from what is now Syria and the Levant in the east to England in the west, and spanning 500 years.

To learn more about the Ashmolean Museum, visit their website at: http://www.ashmolean.org/

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